Friday, September 9, 2016

Cardinal Burke: Christians and Muslims Do Not Worship The Same God

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by MICHAEL W. CHAPMAN September 9, 2016 Catholic Cardinal Raymond Burke, an American and former head of the highest court at the Vatican, said that Christians and Muslims do not worship the same God because the Islamic god "is a governor," and Islam is Sharia, the law "which comes from Allah" and which "must dominate every man eventually."
"I hear people saying to me, well, we're all worshipping the same God, we all believe in love," said Cardinal Burke in an August teleconference about his latest book, as reported by EWTN's National Catholic Register.
"But I say stop a minute and let's examine carefully what Islam is, and what our Christian faith teaches us both," he said.
The cardinal, who is an archbishop and the patron of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta, explained that in Christianity God is the creator of reason and the "giver of revelation," and His law is written "on our hearts" and "we're given a divine grace to live according to that law."
"This is not true in Islam," said Cardinal Burke.
"I don't believe it's true that we're all worshipping the same God, because the God of Islam is a governor," he said.  "In other words, fundamentally Islam is, Sharia is their law, and that law, which comes from Allah, must dominate every man eventually."
"And it's not a law that's founded on love," said Burke.  "To say that we all believe in love is simply not correct."
"And while our experience with individual Muslims may be one of people who are gentle and kind and so forth, we have to understand that in the end what they believe most deeply, that to which they ascribe in their hearts, demands that they govern the world," he said.  
"Whereas, in the Christian faith we're taught that by the development of right reason, by sound metaphysics, and then that which leads to faith and to the light and strength that's given by faith, we make our contribution to society also in terms of its governance," he said. 
"But the Church makes no pretense that it's to govern the world," said Cardinal Burke. "But rather that it's to inspire and assist those who govern the world to act justly and rightly toward the citizens."
If we follow the relativistic idea that there is no real difference between Christian teachings and Islam, if we think we are all worshipping the same God, said Cardinal Burke, "ultimately it will be the end of Christianity."
Our Catholic ancestors "had to fight to save Christianity," said Cardinal Burke, "[b]ecause they saw that Islam was attacking sacred truths, including the sacred places of our redemption."
"We have to have a profound respect for right reason, for the natural law which God has written in every human heart," said the cardinal.  "I think most people don't realize that there is no natural law doctrine in Islam and neither is there an ocean of conscience -- everything is dictates of the laws that are given by either in their sacred text or by those who are entrusted with interpreting the law."
Cardinal Raymond Burke, 68, is the former bishop of LaCrosse, Wisc., and former archbishop of St. Louis, Mo. Between 2008 and 2014, he was the Prefect of the Apostolic Signatura, the head of the highest court at the Vatican.  He is an expert on Canon law, the law that governs the Catholic Church and its teachings. He also is a member of the Vatican's Congregation for the Causes of the Saints. 
Courtesy of CNSNews.com 
Michael writes for CNSNews.com. He has worked as a writer for The McLaughlin Group; associate editor of Consumers' Research magazine; associate editor of Human Events; editorial page editor of The Lima News; journalism fellow for The Phillips Foundation; editorial writer and national issues reporter for Investor's Business Daily; and editorial director of the Cato Institute. Michael graduated with Special Honors in English (B.A.) from the University of Chicago. He lives with his wife, Claire, and their five children in Virginia.

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